Red Shirts Work Best in Facebook Ads: Welcome to the Slippery Slope

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Entrepreneur recently had a great article on how business owners can improve the results they’re seeing from their Facebook advertising. One tip immediately jumped out at us: ads featuring a person wearing a red shirt test 75% better than ads featuring a person wearing a shirt of a different color.

It’s an interesting point, but the real value, we think, is how it highlights the degree to which agencies serving major brands delve down into the details of their social media advertising. Creating three or four versions of the same ad – each one featuring a model in a different colored top – is more work than many small companies are willing to commit to.

But what if it did make a meaningful difference? Would you be willing to find out if your customers will buy more when the model’s wearing a blue shirt or a red shirt or no shirt at all? On one hand, it’s exciting to think that you can perpetually fine-tune your marketing to produce better results. Wearing the manager’s hat, however, it can also be scary to contemplate perpetual fine-tuning.

If switching from a red shirt to a blue shirt produced 3 more sales, overall, was it worth the expense of doing the testing? What if was 30 sales? 300? The line is going to be different for every business owner – but as the business owner, it’s on you to be aware that the line exists and determine where it may be.

The key may be finding balance. Doing no testing at all means you forgo the benefits of discovering what works better. Too much testing takes time and money. As you set your marketing goals for 2016, devote some time to thinking about how you’ll test your ad campaigns, on Facebook and elsewhere. It’s a good way to help ensure the ads you create next year will deliver satisfying results.

Summary
The Analysis and Strategy of Marketing Choices
Article Name
The Analysis and Strategy of Marketing Choices
Description
The decisions you make when marketing your business impact your sales based on the public response to presentation details. It may be worth experimenting with and analyzing to significantly improve your sales in 2016.
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